[Music] Stéphane Clor & HJ Ayala – Motoco

Listening to what I would assume is microtonal guitar work (if my friends would be so kind as to correct me, I would be much obliged) proved to be a very rewarding expeience.  HJ Ayala, a friend of this blog, collaborates with cellist Stéphane Clor in this release clocking in at just under 40 minutes.  This is a quiet release, but the interplay between guitar and cello seems to intricate that it managed to hold my attention throughout.  I’m already a fan of Ayala’s guitar playing, so I’m not surprised he continues to release improvisational music of such great quality, but it’s nice to see him collaborate with Clor, whose work I had never heard until today.  A recommended disc.

[Music] Selen Gülün – Many Faces

I’ve had the pleasure of following Selen Gülün’s work for about five years now, and her albums keep getting more and more interesting.  Many Faces sounds like a work straddling the line between music, theater and painting.  The sounds are delicate, graceful, but never sappy.  The vocals are crisp and sharp, with no feeling of wasted motion.  It’s a beautiful album.

I only have one gripe – I would love to see all of her back catalog become available digitally, at least, through Bandcamp and, if possible, to see these all come out on vinyl.  It’s a selfish wish, of course, because I find her music is suited best to the audiophile world, but one can dream.

[Music] Art Ensemble of Chicago and The Necks to Perform in Melbourne — Avant Music News

Source: Broadwayworld. Supersense is thrilled to announce a once in a lifetime line-up bringing together two legendary ensembles of contemporary music, jazz and improvisation: ground breaking pioneers of American free jazz the Art Ensemble of Chicago and transcendent, internationally revered Australian trio The Necks. In a never-to-be repeated double bill at Hamer Hall on Sunday […]

via Art Ensemble of Chicago and The Necks to Perform in Melbourne — Avant Music News

[Music] Wadada Leo Smith – Spiritual Dimensions

A proper two-album set by Wadada Leo Smith, this double disc comes complete with two different, yet somehow well-meshed bands.  To see what I mean, take a look at each lineup:

Disc One:

Wadada Leo Smith – trumpet
Vijay Iyer – piano, synthesizer
John Lindberg – bass
Pheeroan AkLaff – drums
Don Moye – drums

Disc Two:

Wadada Leo Smith – trumpet
Nels Cline – guitar
Michael Gregory – guitar
Brandon Ross – guitar
Lamar Smith – guitar
Okkyung Lee – cello
John Lindberg – double bass
Skuli Sverrisson – electric bass
Pheeroan AkLaff – drums

These lineups are the cream of the crop of the improvisational music scene.  The music is as enjoyably quirky and free as you would expect from a collaboration as grand as this.

[Music] Akira Sakata & Chikamorachi with Masahiko Satoh – Proton Pump

Avant-garde bebop seems to be the most fitting way to describe this release featuring saxophonist Akira Sakata & Chikamorachi (drummer Chris Corsano and bassist Darrin Grey) along with pianist Masahiko Satoh.  No less than Jim O’Rourke gushes over the the musicianship of this improvisers, but this isn’t a racket-filled noise blast.  The musicianship is astounding, free, and engaging, something a lot of improvisers can’t seem to make happen unless they’re truly something special.  It seems that Sakata has been making music since the 1960s, so I have a bit of exploring to do on his previous work.