[Music] BlindººCoyote – A Beginner’s Guide To Hard Hat Color Coding


A Beginner’s Guide To Hard Hat Color Coding is a new project by BlindººCoyote, longstanding monicker of Drem Bruinsma, a Dutch-born composer now based in Alicante, Spain, whose work under this moniker reminds me of peak-period Cluster finding a bit of time to carouse with an early-wave Industrial band (think Cabaret Voltaire’s more daring experimental work than the dark funk they would produce during their heyday). It would make sense, as BlindººCoyote has been alive as a project since the early 1990s, and this particular sound to me is timeless.  The project has been active (with some periods of non-activity) since its first 1993 release, Phantom Pain/Genkaku no Itami, a project which stemmed from a collaboration with legendary jazz fusion trumpeter Toshinori Kondo.

There’s something very kosmisch about this particular release, though it has flourishes of a cold, metallic bent.  This floats surprisingly easily and envelops this listener into a dreamy, lulling feeling.  There’s also a reminiscence of sounds made by such acts as BlindººCoyote’s one-time collaborators Tuxedomoon (he wrote scores for video, dance, theatre and collaborated with the individual members of Tuxedomoon, amongst others).

As a side note, and quite a tasty one, the first track on this EP, Chapter One: Red Hard Hat Area, will also appear on the compilation Radio Nautilus, released by No Records on June 1.

To explore more of BlindººCoyote’s works, visit his Bandcamp site here, and his Reverb Nation site here.

Josip Račić – Watercolours: Paris Through the Eyes of a Stranger

Beautiful art from Croatia.

Byron's muse

We begin a new month – the pink, flowery and sweet May – with a new artist; Croatian painter Josip Račić (1885-1908) and the watercolours he painted during his brief stay in Paris in 1908.

Josip Račić, Park Luxembourg, 1907

On 10th February 1908, young Croatian artist Josip Račić arrived in Paris. Five months later he was found death in his room. A suicide. A mystery which gave birth to the romanticised myth of this tortured genius’s life. In his short yet turbulent artistic career, from humble beginnings to education in Munich and lastly, his short Parisian period, Račić, having died at the age of twenty-three, managed to create enough works to become a crucial figure for the development of Croatian Modern art and to pave way for the artists who followed.

Račić was born in a village near Zagreb in 1885 and attended grammar school for a short period…

View original post 1,050 more words

[Music] “The Deer’s Cry”, or St. Patrick’s Breastplate, sung by Angelina

A happy St. Patrick’s Day for you Catholic and Orthodox who celebrate his feast. The day has a special meaning for me personally as, last year on this date, we moved into our new home. I was the first to enter the home, and the first benediction, as worthless as it was as I’m no priest, was to utter St. Patrick’s Breastplate before moving items into the house.

[Music] Joyce Moreno – Visions Of Dawn

I can’t think of a Brazilian singer I adore more than Joyce Moreno, and that’s saying quite a bit considering the legendary talent that has come out of the country.

Still, she is in top form in this album working with percussionist Naná Vasconcelos and Mauricio Maestro on vocals.

Though recorded in 1976, this release, as great as it is, didn’t see a proper release until 2009.

[Music] Mulatu Astatke and Black Jesus Experience – Cradle Of Humanity

There’s no one even close in the running of who is the King of Ethio-jazz. Until he passes on from this mortal coil, this title is Mulatu Astatke’s to keep.

This record is from May of 2016, and it features him pairing up with the Australian jazz collective Black Jesus Experience. This is the first I’ve heard of them, but they meld quite nicely with Mulatu’s vibraphone-based works.

[Music] Ghost Bike – Nothing Charms

I don’t know what’s going on in Jerusalem these days, but it seems there’s quite a goth/darkwave/witch-punk scene brewing over there.

Thanks kindly to Tamar Singer for recommending me the work of her colleague Vlad Shusterman (working as Ghost Bike), whose work reminds me of bands like early Sisters of Mercy, Rubella Ballet and X-Mal Deutschland in their calmer moments.