[Music] Expo ’70 – Awakening


There are so many good neo-krautrock and neo-psychedelic bands that it’s almost impossible to keep up with them. It seems a new one comes out every day, and the quality is consistently great.

Take Expo ’70, a band out of Kansas. They tie together Krautrock with a minimalist aesthetic that balances out very well.

[Music] Various Artists – Mind inflamed, Soul adrift Vol. I


Mind inflamed, Soul adrift are a record label out of Austria who have released a free compilation which is actually rather good all the way through. There are 16 tracks on the release, and genres covered include electronic music, drone, noise and psychedelic rock. There doesn’t seem to be any focus to the label, but at least for this recording, that’s not a problem at all. All the tracks manage to work together and make for good listening.

[Music] Bi Kyo Ran – Parallax


Thanks to Guy Segers for publishing this classic of Japanese progressive rock.

Bi Kyo Ran were rather unfairly tagged as a Japanese King Crimson clone.  By this album, that image was finally shed.

They are apparently still active doing soundtracks for TV shows in Japan, but I can’t imagine any of the new material having the power of this disc.

[Music] The Vryll Society – Andrei Rublev

You have to be something else to make a song called Andrei Rublev, especially one with a Krautrock influence. Nice one, lads!

The Fat Angel Sings

Image may contain: indoorLiverpool psych-pop five-piece The Vryll Society have released a new single, “Andrei Rublev.”

The band are currently working on their debut album, and have released a series of singles and an EP titled Pangea through famed Liverpool indie label Deltasonic Records (The Coral, The Zutons, White Room). The band recently supported The Kooks, Blossoms and The Coral in the U.K., and they also made an appearance at last year’s SXSW festival in Austin.

Their stunningly beautiful new song, “Andrei Rublev” is as mellowing as it is hypnotic, with frontman Mike Ellis’ calming lead vocals, their kraut-rock rhythm section, lush synth soundscapes and intricate psych guitar lines. The song’s raw power sneaks up on listeners with its trotting bass line and shimmering Procol Harum-esque keyboards before it erupts with euphoric sonic textures and biting guitar solos.

The Vryll Society’s new track’s title refers to a 1966 Soviet historical drama of the…

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