[Music] Meadowsilver – The Coronation of the Herring Queen

From the ashes of The Hare And The Moon comes Meadowsilver, at least as how I understand it.  Grey Malkin continues to be one of the leaders of psychedelic neofolk, and will eventually take his place among acts like the Legendary Pink Dots, Comus and the like.

This is way too small a taste of this new project, of course, so we wait to see what Meadowsilver will produce next.

[Music] Graham Janz – Songs I’ve Been Singing Quietly To Myself

Graham Janz is a very eclectic folk singer who originally called Brandon, Manitoba, Canada home, though he now resides in Groningen, Netherlands.  He sent me a note asking me to listen to his sketches, and I’m quite pleased that I took him up on his offer.
This isn’t a proper album per se, but home recordings he did, as these are home recordings, but in the spirit of hearing demos by artists like Nick Drake, Peter Hammill (I’m very partial to Van Der Graaf Generator) or even Warren Zevon (Graham covers Roland The Headless Thompson Gunner), it’s great hearing raw, unaffected singing and playing.  No tricks, no studio gadgetry, just a chap with his guitar.  I’m curious to see how he sounds in studio.  His sketches lead me to think that the material will sound quite good.

[Review] Roses Never Fade – Devil Dust

I have a bit of a love-hate relationship with the Apocalyptic Folk/Neofolk genre (or Wyrd Music, or whatever it’s called today). Most of the bands sound the same, usually rip off the old masters of the genre like Death In June, Blood Axis or Allerseelen. The music is nice, but not terribly interesting or something I’d come back to for repeated listening.

Enter Roses Never Fade. The music in their latest release, Devil Dust, published on Neuropa Records, comes as a breath of fresh air.

The first five minutes of the release feel a bit like the scene in the Andrei Tarkovsky, when the pilot flies into Solaris. Hazy, crunchy, like driving right into a cloud. Reminiscent of early Industrial soundtracks and Pink Floyd at their most esoteric. Once things become musical, things become very interesting.

Though it may not have been a conscious act, the band sound like they are channeling The Swans/World of Skin/M. Gira, and mixing it with more progressive folk like the legendary Comus. That was what immediately came to mind. Sure, there are also a few vocal styling which remind me of Douglas Peace in his youth, but the material flows nicely, and by about the 7th minute, I feel like I’m hearing elements of The Byrds in their psychedelic country phase.

A unique release. Go here to find more information about the band and Neuropa Records.