[Music] François N’Gwa / Ogooué / Into The Deep Treasury — Ban Ban Ton Ton

Ban Ban Ton Ton is an amazing blog worth following, and today’s subject material is fascinating:

This quality compilation / retrospective – 180g, fine original artwork by Lea Morichon – comes care of new French label, Into The Deep Treasury. The reissue arm of Arthur Lastmann and Step Daw`s house / techno imprint, Into the Deep Records. Ogooué focuses on the work of West African musician, François N’Gwa, and collects recordings […]

via François N’Gwa / Ogooué / Into The Deep Treasury — Ban Ban Ton Ton

[Music] Ginger Baker Band (with Bill Laswell and Foday Musa Suso) – Kagaribi

The late Ginger Baker was one of the most powerful and innovative drummers to ever grace rock music, especially since he never truly considered himself a “rock” drummer, but rather a jazz drummer.  You can hear it in this release where he collaborates with legendary bassist Bill Laswell and Gambian griot Foday Musa Suso for this 20-minute EP.

Suso and Baker play their instruments off of each other beautifully, while Laswell anchors the chaos.  Recommended.

[Music] Theodosii Spassov & Milcho Leviev – Raga Todor

In 1995, I was approached by the owner of MA Recordings (a kind man whose name I have since forgotten) to sell some of his CDs on consignment.  Among the releases was an album performed by Bulgarian pianist Milcho Leviev.  He had several releases on this imprint because he was living in Los Angeles at the time, and it is one of my life’s regrets not having the chance to meet him.

Milcho passed away this week, and we bid him a fond farewell and a pleasant afterlife.  Here he is collaborating with Bulgarian multi-instrumentalist and a friend of this blog, Theodosii Spassov.

 

[Music] Lakou Mizik + 79rs Gang feat. Régine Chassagne, Win Butler, and Preservation Hall Jazz Band – Iko Kreyò EP

Lakou Mizik, a peach of a band out of Haiti, offer four ripping versions of the classic New Orleans song Iko Iko.

From their Bandcamp site:

Born out of the tragedy of the 2010 earthquake, the members of Lakou Mizik first came together with the goal of promoting positive connections to Haiti through music and culture at a time when international media was filled with negative stories and imagery from the country. They furthered their mission with a celebrated 2016 debut album, “Wa Di Yo,” and multiple international tours.

Lakou Mizik is now preparing to release their second album, “HaitiaNola,” an exploration of the cultural connections between Haiti and New Orleans. Guided by GRAMMY-winning New Orleans producer Eric Heigle (Lost Bayou Ramblers, Arcade Fire, The Soul Rebels), “HaitiaNola” features an A-List of collaborators: Trombone Shorty, Tank from Tank & The Bangas, Win Butler & Régine Chassagne of Arcade Fire, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Cyril Neville, Jon Cleary, Leyla McCalla, The Soul Rebels, Lost Bayou Ramblers, 79rs Gang, Raja Kassis (Antibalas), Anders Osborne and others. The album will be released by Cumbancha on October 25, 2019.

Arcade Fire’s Regine Chassagne and Win Butler, longtime advocates of Haitian music and culture, have been supporting the project, and when they heard the rough mixes from the “HaitiaNola” sessions, they decided to work with the band on a new version of one of the songs. “Iko Kreyòl” is a reclamation of the New Orleans classic “Iko Iko,” a standard Mardi Gras chant that many historians believe descended from Haitian folklore. In their retelling, Lakou Mizik and 79rs Gang Mardi Gras Indian band trade off new verses in Haitian Kreyòl and English that celebrate the epic cultural reunion of Haiti and New Orleans. The glory and connection of these cultures are on full display as the traditional Haitian rara horns mix with the New Orleans second line swagger of the legendary Preservation Hall Jazz Band. By the end, the song winds its way back to its original homeland, Haiti.

The “Iko Kreyòl” EP features the original “HaitiaNola” album version of the song, a Krewe du Kanaval mix, Windöws 98 Dryades to Bèlè Mix, and the 79rs Gang version that will appear on the upcoming 79rs Gang album. A music video of “Iko Kreyol”, filmed in Haiti and New Orleans, will be released later in 2019.

[Music] Daymé Arocena – Trilogía

Daymé Arocena is the most important artist to come out of Cuba since Celia Cruz, and this is not hyperbole.  She will be seen among the legends of Cuban music if she continues on her trajectory.

I’m looking forward to her latest album, Sonocardiogram, to come out in September of this year. In the meantime, she saw fit to release this EP containing three tracks from that album which give a taste of the World Music stew she’s become famous for. Rhumba, Latin Jazz and other styles flow together effortlessly, reminding one of the more fusion-y elements of Miles Davis while he was working with Hermeto Pascoal. ¡Sabor!, indeed!

[Music] ZEAL ONYIA-TRUMPET KING ZEAL ONYIA RETURNS.  — dereksmusicblog

Zeal Onyia-Trumpet King Zeal Onyia Returns. Label: BBE Music. It was none other than Louis Armstrong who upon hearing Zeal Onyia for the first time described him as: “the highlife hep cat of Nigerian jazz trumpet’. Like so many others before him, Louis Armstrong was captivated by the combination of Zeal Onyia’s unique tone, rhythm […]

via ZEAL ONYIA-TRUMPET KING ZEAL ONYIA RETURNS.  — dereksmusicblog

[Music] Ginger Johnson and His African Messengers – Witchdoctor

If Ginger Johnson is a source of inspiration to Afrobeat legend Tony Allen, you know this single is going to be good, and Ginger does not disappoint.  This is raw proto-Afrobeat from around 1967, full of percussive power.  From the Bandcamp site:

In 2015, Freestyle Records re-issued the groundbreaking ‘African Party’ album by the somewhat mysterious figure of Ginger (George Folunsho) Johnson. Recorded in 1967, nearly 20 years after he first arrived in post war London and immediately began performing and recording with London jazz stalwarts Ronnie Scott and Pete King.
Credited by those in the know (including Giles Peterson, Louie Vega, Fela Kuti’s drummer Tony Allen & writer David Toop) as the godfather of Afrobeat, Ginger and his group, The African Messengers enjoyed a varied career as the go to afro-cuban percussion group for recording sessions in the UK, working with Georgie Fame, Osibisa, Madeleine Bell and Quincy Jones – as well as acting us mentor to a young Fela Kuti and members of Cymande who cut their teeth as members of his ensemble. They also performed at The Royal Variety Performance, Ginger’s music featured in the James Bond film ‘Live & Let Die’ and Ginger himself appears on screen drumming in the Hammer Films cult classic ‘She’, and famously performed with The Rolling Stones in Hyde Park in 1969.
Aside from ‘African Party’, and several Hi Life singles released on the Melodisc label in the 50’s, it was thought that there were no further recordings by this hugely influential musician . Eventually, prompted by the attention afforded the Freestyle re-issues – Ginger’s son Dennis Dee Mac Johnson was contacted by was contacted by Uchenna Ikonne, a renowned African music collector, who told him he had discovered one rather battered original copy of a 45 single, released in the mid 70’s on the short lived ‘Afrodesia’ label,

For Record Store Day 2019, Freestyle are proud to release the 2 tracks on a fresh vinyl 45. ‘Witchdoctor’ is not the track of the same name on African Party, but it and ‘Nawa’ (written by Dizzy Gillespie cohort Chano Pozo) demonstrate a musical progression as funk had stamped it’s indelible footprint on Ginger’s music along with afro-cuban rhythms and jazz.
Thanks to Claudio Passavanti at Doctor Mix Studios in London, who has done quite an amazing restoration and re-mastering job on this long lost music.
Watch ‘The Story Of Ginger Johnson’ mini documentary by clicking HERE!