[Music] “22” by Seine — Free Trip Downl Hop

https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/v=2/album=859447339/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/

alternative electronic experimental hip-hop folk indie psychedelic punk Zagreb Croatia Free Download (name your price): https://seine.bandcamp.com/album/22 Continue your visit to Free Trip Downl’Hop, More than 1000 publications: https://freetripdownlhop.wordpress.com/ Notifications on fb: https://www.facebook.com/freetripdownlhop/

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[Music] Djam Karet – The Devouring

I’m particularly pleased to be reviewing this album, as it comes from a VERY local band.  They were living in city of Claremont, California, a college town minutes from my home, and the drummer, Chuck Oken, Jr., owns Rhino Records, by far the best independent record shop in the Inland Empire.  It was the first place I whet my appetite in new music.  Also, the fact that it’s on Cuneiform Records, who were based not too far from me (in Silver Springs, Maryland) when I my then-wife and I lived in Germantown.  It’s so nice to see this album being offered by the label.
Djam Karet are a progressive rock band, but I saw the comparisons to Pink Floyd off-putting.  Floyd is Floyd.  Karet is Karet.  There may be points of commonality here and there, but Djam Karet drift off into a more exploratory mode of long rock improvisations.  If there is anyone who DJ should be compared with, I’d reckon it would be King Crimson between 1973 and 1981, though without the intricacy of Adrian Belew’s guitar skronk.  This is exceptionally good prog, even after 22 years.

[Music] Maurice Louca – Elephantine

Maurice Louca is a 36-year-old composer and guitarist/pianist from Cairo, Egypt.  This work, a co-release by the labels Northern Spy and Sub Rosa Records is his masterpiece; a composition sitting on the apex of psychedelic progressive rock, modern classical, jazz and shaabi music.  Really swinging listening.  From his Bandcamp website:

On Elephantine, his new Northern Spy/Sub Rosa album, Cairo-based Maurice Louca guides a 12-piece ensemble through a panoramic 38-minute odyssey, which he describes as his most ambitious project yet.

One of the most gifted, prolific and adventurous figures on Egypt’s thriving experimental arts scene, Louca has in recent years garnered a global reputation through two previous solo albums and an expanding, evolving lineup of genre-defying collaborations. The Wire called his 2014 sophomore solo effort, Salute the Parrot, “remarkable music—dense, driven and splashed with colour.” In 2017, the self-titled debut by Lekhfa, the trio of Louca and vocalists Maryam Saleh and Tamer Abu Ghazaleh, was praised as an “edgy triumph” in The Guardian and picked by BBC Radio 3’s Late Junction as one of the very best 12 albums of 2017.

For Louca, 36, Elephantine serves as both the pinnacle of his wide-ranging experience and a bold next step in his development as a composer, arranger and bandleader. The celebrated Egyptian visual artist Maha Maamoun has created the album cover art, following her contribution to Salute the Parrot. “There was a blessed thing about the process of making this record,” Louca says of the sessions, held last year in Stockholm and featuring the leader on guitar and piano. “The dynamic between us musically but also as people …What these musicians delivered was really more than I could ask for, Everyone played their hearts out on this record.”

The music—from its pensive lulls through its stretches of hard-grooving hypnosis and moments of avant-jazz catharsis—testifies to that rapport. Best absorbed as a continuous performance, Elephantine’s six individually named tracks nonetheless present striking self-contained landscapes. “The Leper” entrances through a deft use of repetition that Louca gleaned from cosmic jazz, African and Yemeni music and other transcendental modal traditions. (Those who’ve followed Louca’s work might be reminded of the Dwarfs of East Agouza, his mesmeric unit with Shalabi and Sun City Girls’ Alan Bishop.)

“Laika” manages to evoke the minimalists, though on the combustible terms of ’60s and ’70s free jazz; “One More for the Gutter,” on which Louca ingeniously pits one half of his ensemble against the other, albeit in a synergistic way, mines similarly fiery terrain. “The Palm of a Ghost” distills the band to a Cairo-rooted core, featuring stirring spontaneous melodies from oud player Natik Awayez, violinist Ayman Asfour and vocalist Nadah El Shazly. The album’s title track follows, and it too blurs the border between composition and improvisation with gorgeously atmospheric results. “Al Khawaga,” with its colossal ensemble riffs, beautifully dirty swing and impassioned blowing, is an ideal finale.

Elephantine will be released on Vinyl (via Sub Rosa), CD & digital streaming/download (Northern Spy). It was recorded in Stockholm in August 2017 at Stureparken Studios by Ronny Lahti, mixed by Adham Zidan and mastered by Heba Kadry.

credits

released February 1, 2019

Tommaso Cappellato (Drums/Percussions)
Ozun Usta (Drums/Percussions)
Elsa Bergman (Bass)
Pasquale Mirra (Vibraphone)
Piero Bittolo (Baritone Sax/Alto Sax/Bass Flute)
Anna Högberg (Alto Sax)
Rasmus Kjærgård Lund (Tuba)
Isak Hedtjärn (Clarinet/Bass Clarinet)
Nadah El Shazly (Vocals)
Natik Awayez (Oud)
Ayman Asfour (Violin)
Maurice Louca (Guitar/Piano)

Recorded by: Ronny Lahti
(In the Palm of a Ghost) recorded by: Adham Zidan
Mixed by: Adham Zidan
Mastered by: Heba Kadry

[Music] Various Artists – Palenque Palenque: Champeta Criolla & Afro Roots in Colombia 1975 – 91

Colombia is noted for its melange of European, Indigenous and African cultures which have produced gorgeous women, amazing cuisine and, of course, some of the wildest music in South America, giving the mighty Brazil a run for its money.

From the Bandcamp website:

Boasting twenty one pulsating tracks drawn from the northern coasts of Colombia, ‘Palenque Palenque!’ reveals a unique and fascinating story of how Afro Colombian music developed from the 1970s onwards and how the local sound-systems in Cartagena and Barranquilla played such an important role in shaping the sound of the Colombian champeta.

Co-compiled by Lucas Silva (resident of Bogota and owner of Palenque Records) and Soundway Records’ Miles Cleret, the album highlights the long relationship that the Caribbean coast of Colombia has with Africa stretching back to the 17th century. Specifically, the rise of the percussion heavy champeta sound, born out of a wave of popularity for psychedelic Afro, Latin & Caribbean music inspired by the DJs of the time.

The influence of the sound-systems spread to local artists as well as re-energising traditional African folk songs and rhythms that had survived since the days of slavery. Record labels recognized the major change in direction from the days when cumbia and porro ruled the hearts of the ghettoes and began employing bands that began experimenting and tapping into these new cultural and musical movements. Disco Fuentes were one of the first labels to recognize this sudden swing and duly signed Wganda Kenya who went onto record some of the first Afrobeat records in Colombia. The trend in recording African music continued at pace with labels like Machuca, Discos Tropical, Orbe & Costeño quickly adapting to the newly adopted sound of the Palenques and bands like Son Palenque, Cumbia Siglo XX and La Cumbia Moderna de Soledad went onto readapt Afrobeat rhythms with a Caribbean slant.

The vinyl version comes as a triple LP with two extra bonus tracks.

“Every track on this revelatory compilation throws a new element into the oddball mix.”
-The Telegraph 5/5

“Abelardo! It’s great music, and it fills a space, stylistically and sonically, that was previously empty.”
-Pitchfork 8/2

A revolutionary comp, giving the African Colombian music community their due.

[Music] คณะ เบียร์บูด/Khana Bierbood – คนแปลกหน้าจากดินแดนบูรพา​/​Strangers from the far east


This one sure as hell isn’t an ethnographic recording. It’s more along the lines of good, old-fashioned acid-psych. Start with the name of the band, for instance.  Khana Bierbood translates as Strange Brew in Thai, and you can hear the heavy cosmic vibes throughout this record.  What adds an extra notch to its cool factor is that it was produced by Go Kurosawa of Kikagaku Moyo, perhaps the best psychedelic folk band to come of Japan since Masaki Batoh’s Ghost.  I wonder what other monsters Thailand is hiding musically?

[Music] ʻĀina – Lead Me To The Garden


Aloha Got Soul’s latest release is a reissue of a rare psychedelic Christian folk record by a Hawaiian project called ʻĀina, which, according to their Bandcamp album site, “means land or earth in ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi, the Hawaiian language.”

It’s definitely a product of the 1970s, full of hippy vibes, a naïve sense of idealism, and themes which would be recognizable to people who go to Pentecostal Churches. There was nothing bad about this release at all. It was a smooth, mellow and enjoyable listen.