[History] Beware the Ides of March…But Why??

A fun post for those interested in Julius Caesar, Shakespeare’s words and history in general.

Read Martin Stezano’s article here, courtesy of The Old Town Cryer Blog.

Old Town Crier

Beware the Ides of March…But Why??

By Martin Stezano

It’s unlikely even Shakespeare could have predicted how his famous phrase would have evolved.

Not only did William Shakespeare’s words stick, they branded the phrase with a dark and gloomy connotation that will forever make people uncomfortable. It’s probable that many people who use the phrase today don’t know its true origin. In fact, just about every pop culture reference to the Ides—save for those appearing in actual history-based books, movies or television specials—makes it seem like the day itself is cursed.

But the Ides of March actually has a non-threatening origin story. Kalends, Nones and Ides were ancient markers used to reference dates in relation to lunar phases. Ides simply referred to the first full moon of a given month, which usually fell between the 13th and 15th. In fact, the Ides of March once signified the new year…

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