[Music] NUM – False Awakening

Only a fool would believe we’re not living in a great time for music.  The world of pop is banal, and should only be seen as entertainment.  Actual music, that which is trying to continue breaking borders, bending (or snapping) rules, is doing quite well.

Iranian-born composer Maryam Sirvan has been featured on the blog before, having her powerful solo album reviewed here, but this is a newer release where she teams up with fellow composer Milad Bagheri and saxophonist Rezo Kiknadze.  Few composers of this stripe are able to combine the intellectual rigors of electroacoustic music, especially that of the INA-GRM variety, with the gritty, ghostly feel of 20 Jazz Funk Greats-period Throbbing Gristle.

This is a brilliant work, and I hope to see more composers appearing out the of Caucasus soon.

[Music] E.E. Engström & The Twin Street Tree Trunk Love Ensemble – Dive Bar Death: The Necrophilic Act of Remixing

Warm gloom is a great way to describe this album.  Darkjazz master E.E. Engström makes another appearance on the blog (and we’re honored to showcase his work, by the way), providing a smoky, twangy, slightly muffled and claustrophobic work to pound your bottle of homemade absinthe to.  Each release has a gorgeous creepiness to it, so I intend on following his development as an artist.

[Music] The Rosenshoul – Low Winter Sun (Deluxe Edition)

The Rosenshoul are a side project of the folks behind Flowers For Bodysnatchers (namely Duncan Ritchie).  If you thought FFB were bleak, this goes a bit deeper into the bowels of Hades.

What is particularly remarkable is the fact that time stands still for a good portion of this album.  One can feel like they fell into a bottomless pit and know that there is no place you’re going to crash at.  You simply fall and fall into the music, and the coldness and terror emanating from the album never seems to cease.

This is dark ambient music that would have been stellar listening during the 1990’s.  It’s incredibly well-done.

[Music] Stvannyr – Valley Of Shadows

Stvannyr consist of 2/3 of the post-rock/atmospheric metal group Realm of Wolves, but this project might actually be heavier.  We’ve come to expect some fine instrumental tracks from István and his crew, and this album is no exception.  The guitar playing is clean, sharp, excellent in terms of metal music (which is not my cup of tea normally, making this album that much more exceptional).  It’s crisply recorded, and loud enough

Post-rock music keeps branching out into fresh territory, which makes musicians practicing this dark art a pleasure to enjoy.