[Music] Santiago Fradejas – Electric Guitar Vol. II: Yeshua


Our friend Santiago Fradejas has returned with his most powerful album to date. From what I understand, these soundscapes were all done with an electric guitar. He makes the most out of his weapon of choice, convincingly straddling the terrains of instrumental amplified guitar music, post-Industrial, and a very eerie take on contemporary classical/avant-garde music.

[Music] Manja Ristić – The Nightfall


Manja Ristić is a Serbo-Croatian violinist and experimental music composer whose works have left me captivated.  This latest release, The Nightfall, collects for compositions inspired by the seasons.  From her Bandcamp site:

In haiku poetry, “Kigo” is a seasonal reference, a word or group of words which locates the poem in a season of the year, the seasonal association helping the reader imagine the atmosphere and settings of the poem more vividly.  Kigo evokes memories and feelings which vary depending on the readers themselves: their active role is crucial in haiku poetry as different cultural and historical backgrounds may lead to a different interpretation of the poem.

The release was made available by London-based label Naviar Records yesterday.

[Music] Rauppwar & Sir Edgar Carpenter – Reptilian Abnormalities


Though this is nowhere near easy listening, this collaboration between Brazil’s Rauppwar and Mexico’s Sir Edward Carpenter don’t make mere noise – they add a rather cosmic, psychedelic element to it.

Not for the faint of heart, but rewarding in its own way. It was released by Cian Orbe, out of Santiago, Chile.

[Music] Jeff Gburek – FLOOPS


FLOOPS marks the sixth appearance of American expatriate composer Jeff Gburek to this blog.

His latest release is a collection of loop-oriented pieces played on a prepared guitar.  Though Bandcamp is horrible for this sort of work, I recommend buying the album, putting the tracks into “shuffle” mode, and letting the sounds wash over you. You may hear the same pieces over and over again, but the context will feel different.

FLOOPS ends up becoming several hours’ worth of intensive listening, reminding me somewhat of Brian Eno’s generative music or Adrian Belew’s recent flux experiments.