[Music] Santiago Fradejas – Electric Guitar Vol. II: Yeshua


Our friend Santiago Fradejas has returned with his most powerful album to date. From what I understand, these soundscapes were all done with an electric guitar. He makes the most out of his weapon of choice, convincingly straddling the terrains of instrumental amplified guitar music, post-Industrial, and a very eerie take on contemporary classical/avant-garde music.

[Music] Various Artists – Planeta Post-Rock: Flama


Planeta Post-Rock is a (you guessed it) post-rock label out of Portugal. So far, from what I gather, they have made four compilations, with Flama being their most recent. It was released on April 1, so it’s all of a few days old, and it paints a great picture of what the post-rock and post-metal scene must be like old Lusitania.

If you feel like purchasing the whole catalog for 3 Euros, click on this link here.

[Music] Mark McGuire – Glass Bowls

Mark McGuire is a guitarist and improviser out of Cleveland, Ohio, who has a large body of work available via Bandcamp, but this one caught my ear because of pleasant, gentle, floating music within.  There’s a vibe here that reminds me less of psychedelic music, and more of something akin to early Pink Floyd or Krautrock.

[Music] Bassists Alliance Project – Crush

I can’t say I’m the biggest fan of metal music, but this is because I acquired my bias living in Los Angeles during the worst of the “hair band” debacle. However, hearing music like this from the Bassists Alliance Project, especially the bass playing by Alberto Rigoni, reminds me of how intricate and, frankly, progressive, this kind of metal can be.

[Music] HJ Ayala – Wires

HJ (Hector Javier) Ayala is a free-jazz/experimental guitarist originally from Mexico who is now residing in Strasbourg, France. His new release is experimental in the most relaxed and mellow sense of the word. A truly enjoyable release, especially since not only does HJ have his own style, but he references artists such as John Scofield, John Abercrombie (may his name be eternal) and even John Fahey (also, memory eternal). Gorgeous but challenging material here.

[Music] Luís Lapa & Pé de Cabra – O Homem Invisível

I don’t like the term noir for music unless it fits in a film-like connotation, but there’s something pleasantly dark in this new release by Luís Lapa & Pé de Cabra, two Portuguese jazz heads. The Saul Bass-inspired cover art gives it away, I suppose, but the music is quite deep.