[Music] Looking For The Balearic Beat / December 2018 — Ban Ban Ton Ton

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Paraphrasing the Soul Sonic Force and sorting through today`s releases for tunes that could have graced Alfie & Leo`s Amnesia dance floor. JMS have reissued Henri Texier`s first two LPs. Amir from 1976, and Varech from 1977. The cover of the latter will be familiar to anyone who`s visited the Growing Bin, since Basso has […]

via Looking For The Balearic Beat / December 2018 — Ban Ban Ton Ton

What a wonderful blog they run!  If you haven’t squandered all of your Christmas loot yet, Ban Ban Ton Ton have quite an impressive list of records you might want to consider adding to your collection, as well as a Mixcloud podcast to give you a sample of each.

[Music Podcast] Xmas Mizzztape by Debbie Wayne

Thanks very much to Debbie Wayne for posting one of the coolest Christmas podcasts I’ve heard in years!

Here’s the track list:

  1. Things Fall Apart – Cristina
  2. Xmas With Simon – The Fall
  3. Motel Christmas (excerpt) – James Ferraro
  4. Ding Dong – X-Ray Pop
  5. La bataille de neige – Dominique Dumont
  6. Doux Christmas, Noël Soft – Les Amis au Pakistan
  7. No More Christmas Blues – Alan Vega
  8. Breakfast At Christmas – Hillcrest Club
  9. Christmas On Riverside Drive – August Darnell
  10. Partytime – Graeme Miller & Steve Hill
  11. The Twelve Days Of Christmas – Winston Tong
  12. Belle Tristesse 妙なる悲しみ – Miharu Koshi
  13. Noëlle à Hawaii – Antena
  14. Christmas in Suburbia – The Cleaners From Venus
  15. She’s Coming Home – The Wailers

[Music] ʻĀina – Lead Me To The Garden


Aloha Got Soul’s latest release is a reissue of a rare psychedelic Christian folk record by a Hawaiian project called ʻĀina, which, according to their Bandcamp album site, “means land or earth in ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi, the Hawaiian language.”

It’s definitely a product of the 1970s, full of hippy vibes, a naïve sense of idealism, and themes which would be recognizable to people who go to Pentecostal Churches. There was nothing bad about this release at all. It was a smooth, mellow and enjoyable listen.

[Music] Bandcamp Weekly December 11, 2018

It’s been a while since I posted, thanks to a heavy work schedule ending in a small vacation for me, so I return with this week’s Bandcamp Weekly, featuring Joseph Malik, who went from suffering debilitating mental illness to making a slew of brilliant albums and having a fire inside him to make much more.

Check out this week’s podcast, hosted by Andrew Jervis, here.

[Music] Le Mellotron: Paloma Colombe – Radio Amazigh #11 Hommage à Rachid Taha

The legendary Rock & Raï singer Rachid Taha passed away a few days ago at the age of 59 from a heart attack.  Many writers and commentators have eulogized him in his passing, but the best the most fitting tribute comes from Radio Amazigh DJ Paloma Colombe.

Her program is mandatory listening for anyone into out-there music, but in her latest podcast, she combines not only Taha’s music but testimonies, as he not only influenced so many younger artists in France and the Maghreb, but was brilliant at synthesizing sounds in a catchy and energetic way.

The program is in French, so if you needed an excuse to practice, I can’t think of a better thing to inspire you with.

[Music] Various Artists – Anthology of Electroacoustic Lebanese Music


When he’s not working on his own music as Sonologyst, Raffaele Pezzella of Unexplained Sounds captures a lot of attention by releasing travelogue compilations covering the best of experimental and dark ambient music from various countries and regions. This one may well be his crowning effort.

All of these, with the exception of Sharif Sehnaoui, are unfamiliar names, but the sounds, which range from slow, churning, rhythmic drone to post-Industrial noise, the compilation introduces what I’m hoping is an energetic crop of new music composers whose influence will spread quickly both inside and outside the Levant.

Could a Syrian or Iraqi electroacoustic scene be next?  I surely hope so!