[Music] Santiago Fradejas – Electric Guitar Vol. II: Yeshua


Our friend Santiago Fradejas has returned with his most powerful album to date. From what I understand, these soundscapes were all done with an electric guitar. He makes the most out of his weapon of choice, convincingly straddling the terrains of instrumental amplified guitar music, post-Industrial, and a very eerie take on contemporary classical/avant-garde music.

[Music] Soliman Gamil – A Map of Egypt Before the Sands


It’s for albums like this that I have such a love of Bandcamp.  This release originally came out in 1997, and was a collection of pieces of Soliman Gamil’s other records for the Touch Label.  Though they would have made lovely soundtrack music, it’s more an exploration of and experimentation with Egyptian classical music.  A well-done reissue by Mike Harding and Touch.

[Music] Manja Ristić – The Nightfall


Manja Ristić is a Serbo-Croatian violinist and experimental music composer whose works have left me captivated.  This latest release, The Nightfall, collects for compositions inspired by the seasons.  From her Bandcamp site:

In haiku poetry, “Kigo” is a seasonal reference, a word or group of words which locates the poem in a season of the year, the seasonal association helping the reader imagine the atmosphere and settings of the poem more vividly.  Kigo evokes memories and feelings which vary depending on the readers themselves: their active role is crucial in haiku poetry as different cultural and historical backgrounds may lead to a different interpretation of the poem.

The release was made available by London-based label Naviar Records yesterday.

[Music] Aisha Orazbayeva – Telemann Fantasias


Aisha Orazbayeva is London-based violinist who originally hails from Kazakhstan.  She has become a new favorite master of the instrument who easily balances a mastery of avant-garde contemporary music (think of compositions by Luciano Berio and Morton Feldman) and the sumptuous compositions of Georg Philipp Telemann, whose works were the bridge way from the Baroque Era into the Classical Era.

[Music] Leila Abdul-Rauf – Diminution


The first time I came across San Francisco, California resident Leila Abdul-Rauf’s name was when she was playing with the all-female avant-garde metal/dark ambient band Amber Asylum.  She has become a far more powerful musician as time has passed (if you know anything about her previous work, that’s very high praise), and, given the brutal darkness of the one track shared, this new album should end up quaking my speakers rather badly (and yes, I’m looking forward to that).

The album is due to be released on April 13.

[Music] Alessandra Celletti – Sacred Honey

My old friend and former business partner, Michael Sheppard (who passed away a few years ago far too young), did me the honor of introducing me to the work of Italian pianist Alessandra Celletti.  His label, Transparency Records, featured four of her works including a collaboration with German/Austrian Krautrock legend Hans-Joachim Roedelius.

I’ve had the pleasure of keeping in contact with her, and she has graciously notified me of her latest album, Sacred Honey, her second album dedicated to the compositions of Georges I. Gurdjieff and Thomas de Hartmann. It is available on Bandcamp as a CD (though not as a download, unfortunately) and for streaming above, courtesy of Spotify. For the first album inspired by Gurdjieff/de Hartmann, listen to it at Deezer.

The CDs ship out on April 15, just in time for Tax Day.