[Podcasts] The Discovery of Middle Earth: Mapping the Lost World of the Celts by Graham Robb

//embeds.audioboom.com/posts/7054225-the-discovery-of-middle-earth-1-of-2-mapping-the-lost-world-of-the-celts-by-graham-robb/embed/v4?eid=AQAAAPgW0FuRo2sA

//embeds.audioboom.com/posts/7054222-the-discovery-of-middle-earth-2-of-2-mapping-the-lost-world-of-the-celts-by-graham-robb/embed/v4?eid=AQAAAPsW0FuOo2sA

From the John Batchelor podcast site:

A treasure hunt that uncovers the secrets of one of the world’s great civilizations, revealing dramatic proof of the extreme sophistication of the Celts, and their creation of the earliest accurate map of the world.

Fifty generations ago the cultural empire of the Celts stretched from the Black Sea to Ireland and the Highlands of Scotland. In six hundred years, the Celts had produced some of the finest artistic and scientific masterpieces of the ancient world. In 58 BC, Julius Caesar marched over the Alps, bringing slavery and genocide to western Europe. Within eight years the Celts of what is now France were utterly annihilated, and in another hundred years the Romans had overrun Britain. It is astonishing how little remains of this great civilization.

To purchase the book, go here.

This Week’s Six Pillars – Outside the Turner Prize — Six Pillars

The Turner Prize (est. 1984) is awarded annually to an artist born, living or working in Britain, for an outstanding exhibition presentation of their work anywhere in the world the previous year. However the jury is specifically composed of national and international curators, writers and even musicians. What does this self-consciously British show look like […]

via This Week’s Six Pillars – Outside the Turner Prize — Six Pillars

The blog is absolutely one of the best culture blogs going today.  It’s worth following, and will turn you on to bands, events and projects you won’t get much exposure to elsewhere.

[Art/History] The Social Historian: Just A Quick List of 17th Century Euphemisms For Being Drunk

From John Ray, A Collection of English Proverbs (1678). ‘Disguised.’ ‘To have a piece of bread and cheese in your head.’ ‘He’s drunk more than he has bled.’ (ouch) ‘Been in the sun.’ ‘Had a jag.’ ‘Had a load.’ ‘To have got a dish.’ ‘To have had a cup too much.’ ‘To be one and […]

via Just a quick list of 17th century euphemisms for being drunk… — The Social Historian