[Music] Christopher Bissonnette – The Wine Dark Sea — music won’t save you

Italy’s finest post-rock and ambient music blog brings us an album I’ve been looking forward to for a long time. Read the review of Christopher Bissonnette’s new opus below:

CHRISTOPHER BISSONNETTE – The Wine Dark Sea (Dronarivm, 2020) Il quinto lavoro sulla lunga distanza di Christopher Bissonnette, che giunge a cinque anni di distanza dal precedente “Pitch, Paper & Foil”, ne prosegue l’evoluzione del profilo in quello di compositore ambientale a tutto tondo. Sfumando ulteriormente le residue irregolarità che ne caratterizzavano l’espressione originaria, l’artista […]

via — music won’t save you

[History] Beware the Ides of March…But Why??

A fun post for those interested in Julius Caesar, Shakespeare’s words and history in general.

Read Martin Stezano’s article here, courtesy of The Old Town Cryer Blog.

Old Town Crier

Beware the Ides of March…But Why??

By Martin Stezano

It’s unlikely even Shakespeare could have predicted how his famous phrase would have evolved.

Not only did William Shakespeare’s words stick, they branded the phrase with a dark and gloomy connotation that will forever make people uncomfortable. It’s probable that many people who use the phrase today don’t know its true origin. In fact, just about every pop culture reference to the Ides—save for those appearing in actual history-based books, movies or television specials—makes it seem like the day itself is cursed.

But the Ides of March actually has a non-threatening origin story. Kalends, Nones and Ides were ancient markers used to reference dates in relation to lunar phases. Ides simply referred to the first full moon of a given month, which usually fell between the 13th and 15th. In fact, the Ides of March once signified the new year…

View original post 343 more words

[Music] Throbbing Gristle – Adrenaline / RIP Genesis P-Orridge

In 1987, I bought two albums which did a number on me.  I remember purchasing CD1 and came across this seven-inch which opened a doorway into how wonderfully weird experimental music could be.  It hit me so hard that, in the folly of youth, I ended up having the Throbbing Gristle logo tattooed on my right arm.

This was the first properly “Industrial” song that caught my attention, and following Genesis P-Orridge’s musical and personal development, not always a pleasant thing to see, was nevertheless fascinating.  He has gone to meet his maker.  May he rest in peace.

You can read an obituary here, courtesy of the Los Angeles Times, or find one in your favorite indie magazine.

[Music] Web Web – Worshippers

Compost Records released an album by Web Web a few days ago which hit a sweet spot for me. The album is a magical combination of free improv (without the racket), kosmische musik, soul and fusion, laced with elements of trip-hop, hip-hop, and any other -hop which comes to mind.

Joy Denalane’s voice is sumptuous. She is at ease telling a soulful story as she is using her voice as a improvisational instrument. Roberto Di Gioia, Tony Lakato and Stefan Pintey add a lush background for the three to play in.

This album will be my go-to disc for 3 a.m. listening for the foreseeable future. It is that good.

[Music] Saulius Petreikis – Negirdėta Lietuva

Saulius Petreikis is the lynchpin of the Lithuanian ethno-folk music scene.  This is a good survey of ethnic music preserved and reinterpreted from the villages of the country.  For Saulius’ Bandcamp site:

Unheard Lithuania – is a collection of musical sounds that were heard long before we were born and will exist long after we are gone. It gathers hundred-years-old stories about our ancestors and the forests and fields they used to live in. Acquaintance with this music began one spring morning in Barstyčiai, Lithuania. I was still a little boy (four years old or so), when my grandfather made me my first flute. Its’ sound still haunts me to this day.

Unheard Lithuania is the melodies and stories rooted deep into our very being. It is young shepherds playing molinukai and skudučiai flutes. It is a child with a jaw harp between his lips and an old man in the field, mourning for his loved one. It is the sound of a horn at the edge of a forest announcing the arrival of the herd. It is a little girl talking to the birds with her lumzdelis flute.

Special website with videos (in english and lithuanian languages) – www.ltinstrumentai.lt