[Music] The Vryll Society – Andrei Rublev

You have to be something else to make a song called Andrei Rublev, especially one with a Krautrock influence. Nice one, lads!

The Fat Angel Sings

Image may contain: indoorLiverpool psych-pop five-piece The Vryll Society have released a new single, “Andrei Rublev.”

The band are currently working on their debut album, and have released a series of singles and an EP titled Pangea through famed Liverpool indie label Deltasonic Records (The Coral, The Zutons, White Room). The band recently supported The Kooks, Blossoms and The Coral in the U.K., and they also made an appearance at last year’s SXSW festival in Austin.

Their stunningly beautiful new song, “Andrei Rublev” is as mellowing as it is hypnotic, with frontman Mike Ellis’ calming lead vocals, their kraut-rock rhythm section, lush synth soundscapes and intricate psych guitar lines. The song’s raw power sneaks up on listeners with its trotting bass line and shimmering Procol Harum-esque keyboards before it erupts with euphoric sonic textures and biting guitar solos.

The Vryll Society’s new track’s title refers to a 1966 Soviet historical drama of the…

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[Music] Leila Abdul-Rauf – Diminution


The first time I came across San Francisco, California resident Leila Abdul-Rauf’s name was when she was playing with the all-female avant-garde metal/dark ambient band Amber Asylum.  She has become a far more powerful musician as time has passed (if you know anything about her previous work, that’s very high praise), and, given the brutal darkness of the one track shared, this new album should end up quaking my speakers rather badly (and yes, I’m looking forward to that).

The album is due to be released on April 13.

[Music] Jeff Gburek – FLOOPS


FLOOPS marks the sixth appearance of American expatriate composer Jeff Gburek to this blog.

His latest release is a collection of loop-oriented pieces played on a prepared guitar.  Though Bandcamp is horrible for this sort of work, I recommend buying the album, putting the tracks into “shuffle” mode, and letting the sounds wash over you. You may hear the same pieces over and over again, but the context will feel different.

FLOOPS ends up becoming several hours’ worth of intensive listening, reminding me somewhat of Brian Eno’s generative music or Adrian Belew’s recent flux experiments.