[Music] Kaoru Inoue – Em Paz – Groovement Organic

It looks like I’ve stumbled upon another magnificent indie music blog. This one is definitely worth following!

Ban Ban Ton Ton

Kaoru Inoue is an elder statesman of Japan`s underground dance music community. He`s been releasing music, a uniquely Japanese spiritual take on House and Techno, since the late 1990s. Under the alias Chari Chari. Branching into Ambient, in cahoots with fellow travellers like Calm and guitarist DSK. Tunes appearing on offshoots of his own Seeds & Ground, and Kenji Takimi`s Crue-L. Still super active as a DJ, he`s been quiet of late on the production front. Save a couple of limited pressings as Aurora Acoustic, and a few edits (Dif Juz; 23 Skidoo). One split 12 with another Tokyo Dance veteran, Masanori Ikeda.

Em Paz, on Portuguese label, Groovement Organic, is electro-acoustic Fusion. Picking up Jon Hassell`s idea of a “Fourth World”. In so much that it uses traditional elements, and technology, to create a new musical location that`s impossible to pinpoint. Indian tabla. Synergising drones, from sitar…

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[Music] Mulatu Astatke and Black Jesus Experience – Cradle Of Humanity

There’s no one even close in the running of who is the King of Ethio-jazz. Until he passes on from this mortal coil, this title is Mulatu Astatke’s to keep.

This record is from May of 2016, and it features him pairing up with the Australian jazz collective Black Jesus Experience. This is the first I’ve heard of them, but they meld quite nicely with Mulatu’s vibraphone-based works.

[Music] Here’s One I Prepared Earlier

Nice to see John Cage and his infamous 4’33” get its due in a proper article written about it.

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Find somewhere to sit, it doesn’t matter where. Imagine a musician entering the space and preparing to perform. Count to two hundred and seventy-three in beats as close to a second apart as you can manage.

Applaud as the performer exits the space.

You have just created a mental facsimile of the most famous work of American composer John Milton Cage (1912–1992). It is called 4’33” and is not, as is commonly assumed, a piece of silence but rather a period of time to notice the sounds, the music if you will, of your environment.

The piece is one of many explorations of expectations and context that Cage undertook during his career, a musical life rooted in the European tradition but moulded and influenced profoundly by Cage’s interest in Eastern philosophy, particularly Zen Buddhism.

It has been said that all behaviour is communication, which certainly includes creating music, one…

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